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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the jobs picture with two economists with ties to the presidential candidates: john taylor of stanford university and the hoover institution. he advises the romney campaign on economic issues. and austan goolsbee of the university of chicago's booth school of business. he served as president obama's chairman of the council of economic advisers until last year. to the extent mob set aside the rhetoric of the campaign if you can for a moment, tell us about the bigger picture. what strikes you most, what worries you most about the jobs picture now and in the coming years? >> well, i would say any reputable economist says every month don't just take any one month numbers, try to take a step back and look at the trend that's far more accurate in this. i think if you look at the trend the overall job creation has been relatively solid for the last three months. the overall growth rate of the economy is the most worrisome thing that it's been modest, you know, moderate growth. and that that is about the fastest growth rate of all the advanced countries of the world. i think the underlying fea
been mixed messages. even ohio's republican governor john kasich who was elected in 2010 points to the state's economic gains, like here at the party's convention in tampa. >> that when we came into office we were 48th in job creation. you know where we are today? we're 4th in america in job creation, and number one in the midwest. both campaigns are focused on getting people to the polls, in large numbers and early. a recent court decision here extended the time allowed to vote before election day and 35% of voters are expected to cast their ballots before november 6th. earlier this week in youngstown voters came in steady streams to the polling station for ohio's county. the campaigns know thief ree early vote locks in support they already have. and it's not just economic issues impacting vters heading toast their ballots. >> still pretty undecide. i also feel mitt romney has a lot of ideas about the economy that would be helpfulment i just don't always agree with his women rights ideas. >> regardless of what is driving voters decisions, this corner of ohio could be the key to
and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to just the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be other information that's added. this information comes from commercial marketing firms. an email address,
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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